Press Release07 Aug 2022


World U20 Championships celebrated as Cali confirms status as a 'cradle of champions'

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Athletes compete in the women's 5000m final at the World Athletics U20 Championships Cali 22 (© Marta Gorczynska)

The World Athletics U20 Championships Cali 22 has been celebrated as one of the most successful editions in the history of the event as magnificent medal moments and record-breaking results showcased the future stars of the sport.

Over six days of competition between 1-6 August, two world U20 records, two world U20 best performances, 14 championship records, nine area U20 records, 10 senior national records, 97 national U20 records and 518 personal bests were achieved in the Pascual Guerrero Olympic Stadium, securing the latest edition of the global showpiece its place in the history books.

USA topped the medal table with seven gold, four silver and four bronze medals, ahead of Jamaica (6, 7, 3), Ethiopia (6, 5, 1), Kenya (3, 3, 4) and South Africa (2, 1, 2).

The event in Cali was also a championships of ‘firsts’, with Uruguay winning its first ever medal, and Dominica, Malaysia and Saint Vincent achieving their first ever top eight positions.

Demonstrating the truly global reach of the sport, 1387 athletes took part from 126 different countries. Their participation pushed the World Athletics U20 Championships past the 20,000 milestone in terms of the number of athletes who have competed since the first edition in 1986.

“I hope you all agree that the World Athletics U20 Championships Cali 22 has been a spectacular success,” World Athletics’ Chief Executive Jon Ridgeon said at the closing press conference. “I think we can say that Cali has once again emerged as the ‘cradle of champions’, much like the World U18 Championships that we enjoyed in this very stadium back in 2015.”

Ramiro Varela, President of the local organising committee, said: “The success of the championships is a three-way affair: World Athletics, Colombia and Valle Del Cauca. The success was because of the presence of the athletes, their teams and their incredible results. And the success is the result of long-term planning and the hard work of a team of professionals who have worked tirelessly to offer these championships to the world.”

Two of the stars to emerge were Botswana’s Letsile Tebogo, who retained his 100m title in a world U20 record and claimed 200m silver in a brilliant battle with Israel’s Blessing Akawasi Afrifah, and Colombia’s Valentina Barrios, who secured silver for the host nation in the javelin.

“I would like to thank you for hosting us. I am really satisfied with everything I have done in these championships,” said Tebogo, who ran a world U20 record of 9.91 in the 100m. “Of the memories I have from Cali, the 100m final is the one to take back home with me, and also the 200m final.”

Barrios said the U20 championships was a huge stepping stone in her career.

“I was extremely nervous during the qualification round,’’ she said. “I felt a little better during the final, but it was still difficult for me to deal with the pressure. But then I told myself: ‘I am here in Colombia, competing in front of my people. I cannot let this opportunity go.’ I was able to refocus and perform well, and this is something that will help me when I turn senior.”

In just two years’ time, the World Athletics U20 Championships will return to South America, when Lima, Peru, hosts the event between 20-25 August 2024.

The World Athletics U20 Championships Cali 22 in numbers


RECORDS SET

2 world U20 records: Letsile Tebogo (BOT) in the men’s 100m final - 9.91; Jamaica in the women’s 4x100m final - 42.59

2 world U20 best performances: United States in the mixed 4x400m heats - 3:18.65; United States in the mixed 4x400m final - 3:17.69

14 championship records: Tina Clayton (JAM) in the women’s 100m final - 10.95, Letsile Tebogo (BOT) in the men’s 100m heats - 10.00; Letsile Tebogo (BOT) in the men’s 100m final - 9.91; Letsile Tebogo (BOT) in the men’s 200m heats - 19.99; Blessing Akwasi Afrifah (ISR) and Letsile Tebogo (BOT) in the men’s 200m final - 19.96; Roisin Willis (USA) in the women’s 800m final - 1:59.13; Birke Haylom (ETH) in the women’s 1500m final - 4:04.27; Kerrica Hill (JAM) in the women’s 100m hurdles final - 12.77; Jaydon Hibbert (JAM) in the men’s triple jump final - 17.27m; Adriana Vilagos (SRB) in the women’s javelin final - 63.52m; Jamaica in the women’s 4x100m final - 42.59; United States in the mixed 4x400m heats - 3:18.65; United States in the mixed 4x400m final - 3:17.69

9 area U20 records: Letsile Tebogo (Africa) in the men’s 100m heats - 9.91; Letsile Tebogo (Africa) in the men’s 200m heats - 19.99; Blessing Akwasi Afrifah (Europe) and Letsile Tebogo (Africa) in the men’s 200m final - 19.96; Adriana Vilagos (Europe) in the women’s javelin final - 63.52m; India (Asia) in the mixed 4x400m heats - 3:19.62; United States (NACAC) in the mixed 4x400m heats - 3:18.65; India (Asia) in the mixed 4x400m final - 3:17.76; United States (NACAC) in the mixed 4x400m final - 3:17.69

10 national senior records

97 national U20 records

14 world U20-leading performances

518 personal bests

MEDALS AND PLACINGS

41 countries won medals

24 countries won gold medals

23 countries won silver medals

29 countries won bronze medals

70 countries finished in the top eight (point scoring position)

Uruguay won its first ever medal (bronze)

Dominica, Malaysia and Saint Vincent achieved their first ever top eight positions

PARTICIPATION

1387 athletes from 126 different countries

735 male and 652 female athletes

18 years, 6 months and 18 days is the average age of participants

SOCIAL MEDIA AND DEVELOPMENT

15 million video views

1.5 million engagements

130,000 growth in followers across social channels

1 million followers reached on YouTube

2 million followers reached on Instagram

9.4 million overall fanbase

43 students and journalists from across the Americas were involved in World Athletics’ media development programme - six days of information sessions covering topics including media operations, story-telling, social media, competition rules and the use of statistics in our sport.

World Athletics